Wick Communications

Archive for 2018|Yearly archive page

New publisher, old responsibilities

In journalism on 5 Jan 2018 at 11:01 am
The following is the text of an email sent to Wick Communications publishers and the board of directors earlier this week.
Like the newspapers under the Wick Communications banner, the venerable New York Times is largely a family affair. If you think Wick newspapers have deep roots, consider that Adolph Ochs purchased the struggling big-city newspaper in 1896 — three years before the birth of Wick Founder Milton I. Wick. This week, the tradition continued when Ochs’ great-great-grandson took over for his father as publisher of the Times.

Upon that auspicious occasion, this week that new publisher, A.G. Sulzberger, penned an open letter to customers of the world’s most important journalistic factory. It was a spirited and inspiring declaration that the industry standard-bearer would continue to lead the way. You can read it here. Wick CEO Francis Wick suggested that I might address it and that is why you are reading these words.

Sulzberger’s message is important to those of us in the trenches in places like New Iberia, La., and Montrose, Colo. We don’t cover a sprawling metropolis and we aren’t sending reporters to the ends of the earth, but we are fully engaged in the war at home. In 2018, it is not hyperbole to say journalism and the values underlying the First Amendment are under attack. Sulzberger put it like this:

There was a reason freedom of speech and freedom of the press were placed first among our essential rights. Our founders understood that the free exchange of ideas and the ability to hold power to account were prerequisites for a successful democracy. But a dangerous confluence of forces is threatening the press’s central role in helping people understand and engage with the world around them.” 

He goes on to note what you already know. The business model that promoted an unwavering free press is, well, wavering. In Sierra Vista and Green Valley and Ontario, we, too, must find new ways to tell the stories of a new world. We will continue to reflect our communities with ink on paper, but we will also get better with audio and video, we will seek interactive solutions-oriented journalism that will literally leap off the page and into living rooms, classrooms and community rooms. We will host important meetings aimed and sharing and solving our communities’ most pressing problems, and we will deftly share our stories and our successes through ever-evolving social media. Storytelling like that has a value. …

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